Portion Control


Portion CONTROL
Another battle in fight to eat right is portion sizing! Larger portions have more calories, obviously. But they also encourage people to eat more than they otherwise would and to underestimate how much food they're actually consuming. Healthy portion control is all about moderation. It's important to not eat too much of any particular type of food, but it's also equally important to avoid eating too little. Learn about the recommended serving sizes of various types of food, and do your best to adhere to them. This will ensure that you are eating a proper amount. It's important that you not limit the amount of food you eat too severely when you exercise portion control and remember eating moderate portions of only food that is unhealthy in general will not necessarily yield you good results in terms of weight loss..

How to deal with the portion size problem? Use small plates and cups when your eating or measure your food. When eating out, order appetizers, not entrees. Order the small size, or share large portions with friends. You'll condition your body to become full after consuming a smaller amount of food and avoid overeating. Over time controlling your portion size will get easier and easier.

Here are 10 simple ways to keep your portions a healthy size:
  1. Measure accurately. For foods and beverages, use gadgets like a measuring cup, tablespoon, teaspoon, or food scale.
  2. Learn how to estimate serving sizes. ‘Ballpark’ food portion sizes by estimating serving sizes in comparison to known objects. For example, three ounces of cooked meat, fish, or poultry is about the size of a deck of cards.  Other easy measurements to eyeball include:
    • ½ cup is the size of an ice cream scoop
    • 1 cup is the size of a tennis ball
    • 1 ounce of cheese is the size of a domino
  3. Use portion control dishware. Pick out smaller plates, bowls, cups, and glassware in your kitchen and measure what they hold. You might find that a bowl you thought held 8 ounces of soup actually holds 16, meaning you’ve been eating twice what you planned.
  4. Dish out your servings separately. Serve food from the stove onto plates rather than family-style at the table, which encourages seconds.
  5. Make your own single-serving packs. Re-portion bulk quantities of favorite foods such as pasta, rice, and cereal into individual portions in zipper bags so that when you’re in the mood for some food you’ll instantly see the number of portions you’re preparing.
  6. Add the milk before the coffee. When possible, put your (fat-free) milk into the cup before adding the hot beverage to better gauge the amount used.
  7. Measure oil carefully. This is especially important because oil (even the healthful kinds like olive and safflower) have so many calories; don’t pour it directly into your cooking pan or over food.
  8. Control portions when eating out. Eat half or share the meal with a friend. If eating a salad, ask for dressing on the side. Dip your fork into the dressing and then into the salad.
  9. Add vegetables. Eat a cup of low-calorie vegetable soup prior to eating a meal, or add vegetables to casseroles and sandwiches to add volume without a lot of calories.
  10. Listen to your hunger cues. Eat when hungry and stop when satisfied or comfortably full. “Try to gauge when you are 80 percent full and stop there, There will be more food at the next meal or snack!






No comments

comment below to let me know what you think!